Health Women's Health

Women’s Health Week

May 13-19th is National Women’s Health Week – and while it is appropriate to take time to focus on such an important subject, the Health Nucleus is committed to women’s health all year long. In addition to screening for a series of diseases, we provide insights into the current state of your health and how you can make lasting improvements.

Did you know? Women of all ages who get enough physical activity can reduce their risk of heart disease and cancer — the most common diseases women have to worry about. Men get more physical activity than women. We can change this — let’s move! Resistance Training Instructional Video

Women need 2.5 hours of moderate-intensity physical activity every week — about 30 minutes a day. But fewer than 50% of women are getting enough aerobic activity, and only 20% get enough muscle-strengthening activity. Osteoporosis and Resistance Training Explained

Just 30 minutes of brisk walking a day is enough to lower your risk of breast cancer.

The more exercise you do, the more your risk of early death goes down. A woman who exercises 30 minutes every day can lower her risk of dying early by 27% compared with someone who exercises just 30 minutes once a week.

Tips

Try these ideas for fitting more physical activity into your daily routine.

  • Add walking or biking to your commute.
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator.
  • Turn on your favorite music and dance.

Did you know? We make 200 decisions about food each day. That’s a lot of chances to eat healthy every day. All of your food and drink choices matter!

Nearly 2 out of 3 women in the United States die from chronic diseases like heart disease, cancer, or diabetes. A healthy diet and weight can help protect you from many chronic diseases. Choose lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean proteins to keep you healthy.

Fruits and vegetables are a great way to get the vitamins and nutrients you need!

Tips

  • Switch some of your everyday foods for healthier options.
  • Eat whole-grain bread instead of white bread, and brown rice instead of white rice.
  • Try whole fruit, like apples and oranges, instead of fruit bars or fruit-flavored snacks.
  • Drink water, seltzer, or unsweetened tea instead of energy or fruit drinks or soda.

These seemingly small adjustments can make a big impact on your health. The Health Nucleus empowers clients with comprehensive health information to identify disease early, and to help optimize health  for the future. Visit our Community section and filter under topics that interest you for more information.

Sources

www.health.gov/paguidelines/pdf/paguide.pdf

www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/2014/063.pdf

www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/prevention/physicalactivity

www.health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/chapter2.aspx

www.cnpp.usda.gov/sites/default/files/dietary_guidelines_for_americans/DGAC-Mtg3-Minutes-final.pdf

www.cdc.gov/women/lcod/2013/index.htm

www.choosemyplate.gov/vegetables-nutrients-health